VNPS Home

2020 Research Grant Application Period Closes
February 14, 2020

2020 Research Grant Application Period Closes
February 14, 2020

2020 Research Grant Application Period Closes
February 14, 2020

Photo by National Park Service

Photo by National Park Service

Photo by National Park Service

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax

;kl;lk;lk;lk

Heading layer

2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

Photo by Betty Truax

Photo by Betty Truax

Photo by Betty Truax

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
Heading layer

Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
Heading layer

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

News & Updates

• Support our Annual Fundraiser: Plant Virginia Natives!

Register Now for the 2020 Annual Workshop in Charlottesville on Saturday, March 14.

• The 2020 Research Grant Application Period closes on February 14, 2020. View more information and apply.

• VNPS Funded Research Reveals Which Trees are Dying and Why

• Piedmont Chapter Curlyheads Flower T-Shirts are now available for sale! These are beautiful shirts though in limited quantities.

• VNPS Member Harry Glasgow Honored by Prince William Conservation Alliance.

• The VNPS mourns the loss of its founder, Mary Painter, on October 6 2019. View more information and Mary's obituary.

Join

Become a Member:
Support Our Mission.

Donate

Support VNPS with
your donation today.

Upcoming Events

Find Field Trips, Meetings, Programs and Plant Sales.

Find a Chapter

Get involved in your
local VNPS chapter.

The Right Kind of Pollinator Garden

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | June 14, 2015

A couple of reminders, if folks will, regarding pollinator gardens, especially those to attract and host Monarch butterflies: The overarching principle for all ecological restoration plantings (i.e., those involving the correct use of native plants in parks, waterways, and natural areas) is to “Do No Harm” to the native flora, communities, wildlife, and natural landscape… [Read More]

Specialist Bees Need Special Plants

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | May 30, 2015

Sam Droege, USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center Biologist, and a bee expert who has studied native bees all around the world, gave a presentation on specialist bees and the plants that support them at the Arlington Library on May 11, 2015. The talk was sponsored jointly by the VNPS Potowmack Chapter, and the Arlington Regional… [Read More]

Atlantic Coast Pipeline Update, May 2015

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | May 24, 2015

In an attempt to keep our members informed about the process and progress of the construction of the new pipeline through Virginia, we have recently added four documents to the website under the Pipeline tab, (which is listed under ‘Conservation’ in the navigation bar). Our Conservation Chairperson, Marcia Mabee Bell, has been tireless in keeping… [Read More]

Hiwassee: A Floral Delight!

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | May 9, 2015

The New River Trail provided a welcome dose of colorful spring flowers for the members of our New River Chapter and their friends last month. This trail is is actually a 57-mile linear park that follows an abandoned railroad right-of-way paralleling the scenic and historic New River. Old rail beds make gentle hiking and the… [Read More]

A Call for Citizen Scientists from Virginia Working Landscapes

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | April 17, 2015

 Our partners at Virginia Working Landscapes are conducting important surveys this summer, and Celia Vuocolo, their Plant and Pollinator Survey Coordinator is making a special call to readers of this blog for their help. In her post, Celia will tell you about the reasons for the research being done, and what it takes to become… [Read More]

Second Annual Poison Ivy Day

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | March 31, 2015

You didn’t know? Well, it’s true.  April 1, 2015 is officially the Second Annual Poison Ivy Day. You missed the first Annual PI Day? For goodness sake, you need to pay closer attention! Virginia is the pioneer state on this one, but we are pretty sure others will be following our lead by next year. California… [Read More]

Manage White-Tailed Deer to Protect Our Natural Heritage

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | March 12, 2015

Most residents of Virginia understand the need to change human land use practices to stop or minimize habitat destruction and preserve our native plant communities. An increasing number of people also support combating the spread of non-native invasive species to include problem plant species and insects such as the emerald ash borer beetle which girdles… [Read More]

The Living Landscape: Summary of Rick Darke’s Talk

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | March 2, 2015

Rick Darke recently gave a talk on his new book, co-authored with Doug Tallamy, The Living Landscape;  sponsored by our Prince William Wildflower Society Chapter and delivered to a full house of over 180 attendees. This new book is much more than a traditional “how-to” design manual. It is a thoughtful analysis of the natural harmony of relationships… [Read More]

Hope and Reality for Urban Ecosystems

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | February 24, 2015

Years ago, I served on Maryland’s Plant Reintroduction Task Force, which was largely convened to address the merits, legal ramifications, and biological soundness of reintroducing rare taxa “recently lost from its historic range” or to enhance dwindling populations that remained in their historic natural settings (PRTF 1999). Specifically at the time, this involved a proposal… [Read More]

Meet The Witch Grasses!

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | February 1, 2015

​Grasses are often overlooked and dismissed as difficult to identify – too technical and cryptic. No wonder, then, that the enigmatic witch grasses (genus Dichanthelium) have really gotten the short end of the stick. It is at least worth your while to know that these little grasses are quite successful and diverse. Most habitats in… [Read More]