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Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
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Register for Our Annual Meeting September 27–29 in Front Royal

Register for Our Annual Meeting September 27–29 in Front Royal

Register for Our Annual Meeting September 27–29 in Front Royal

Shanandoah River State Park by Karen Hendershot

Shanandoah River State Park by Karen Hendershot

Shanandoah River State Park by Karen Hendershot

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
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Check out upcoming Native Plant Sales!

Check out upcoming Native Plant Sales!

Check out upcoming Native Plant Sales!

Downy Rattlensnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens)

Downy Rattlensnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens)

Downy Rattlensnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens)

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax

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2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

2019 Wildflower of the Year: New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)

Photo by Betty Truax

Photo by Betty Truax

Photo by Betty Truax

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
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Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Mountains with Flame Azaleas

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Photo by Nancy Vehrs

Ceanothus americanus - VNPS 2019 Wildflower of the Year - Photo by Betty Truax
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Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

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News & Updates

Register now for the 2019 Annual Meeting and Conference in Front Royal on the weekend September 27-29. new

Don't miss all the news and information in the Spring, 2019 Sempervirens newsletter.

VNPS Member Catherine Ledec was named the Fairfax County 2018 Citizen of the Year.

Keep VNPS in your giving plans

VNPS supports conservation of biologic “hot spots”, protects shrinking natural environments across the state and raises awareness and appreciation for our native plants.

This year our fundraiser supports updates to the Flora of Virginia, which will be available in the Flora App as soon as completed. You can be assured that your donations to VNPS go right to the heart of what we are about. Donate Now!

Membership

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Support VNPS with your donation today.

Upcoming Events

Find Field Trips, Meetings, Programs and Plant Sales.

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Get involved in your local VNPS chapter.

Imperiled Plants and Missing Pieces

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | August 24, 2014

Plants that on are imperiled lists today may become missing pieces tomorrow unless action is taken. Do we know which ones are imperiled? Will it make a difference if rare plants disappear? The Virginia Native Plant Society thinks it does, and has taken steps to help conserve some of the wildflowers in our state that… [Read More]

Unwanted and Unloved: Porcelain-berry!

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | August 12, 2014

This is the time of year when it becomes apparent that porcelain-berry is making a bold attempt at taking over the world. Or at least vast swathes of Virginia’s forests, especially those near urban areas. Suddenly those white flowers and multi-colored berries are appearing on what seemed yesterday to be innocent green vines…in fact, didn’t… [Read More]

Seeds of a New Chapter?

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | August 3, 2014

Virginia’s Eastern Shore: it’s that part of the state that is separated from the rest of the Commonwealth, attached by land to Maryland and connected to the rest of Virginia only by the 17.6-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, an engineering marvel. All too often the ES is omitted from simple maps of the state, and residents… [Read More]

The Hunt Is On: Meet the Treasures!

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | July 28, 2014

The VNPS Fundraiser for 2014 is part two of the Natural Treasure Hunt, an effort to make funds available for researching, locating, and mapping some of Virginia’s floral treasures that are in need of help if we want to keep them around. On the homepage of Virginia’s Department of Natural Heritage , (DNH), our partners in the… [Read More]

Wavyleaf Basketgrass: Help Stop it Now!

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | July 20, 2014

Driving into the Nature Conservancy’s Fraser Preserve on a warm July morning is like entering a sanctuary. The hustle and bustle of the Beltways is left behind as I head west on Georgetown Pike, watching the houses get further and further apart. A few more turns and dips and I start wondering if I’m lost…. [Read More]

Asclepias Tuberosa, the Butterfly Queen

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | July 15, 2014

How did such a lovely plant come by so many spurious common names? Poor Asclepias tuberosa. Known by many as butterfly weed, but some of its alternative common names are even worse than that. Pleurisy root, for example. Indigenous peoples once chewed its tough taproot to cure pulmonary ailments, presumably it had a more enticing… [Read More]

Wild and Wonderful West Virginia: Report from the Field

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | July 7, 2014

In a perfect combination rare plants and plant people came together on last month’s VNPS extended field trip to West Virginia. The “flower per hour” crowd enjoyed perfect weather and were very happy taking time to get to know the plants and watch for pollinators, reported Sally Anderson, who was on the trip, and has… [Read More]

A Boy Named Sue: When and Where to Use a Plant’s Scientific Name

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | July 1, 2014

Why is using a plant’s scientific name important? Especially when common (vernacular) plant names can give you so much more information about the thought process and cultural beliefs of the people that named the plants. The use of vernacular in plant naming is a time-honored tradition that should never be thrown out because of what… [Read More]

Fracking in Virginia: Report from Conservation Chair

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | June 26, 2014

VNPS Conservation Chair, Marcia Mabee Bell, attended a workshop on June 24, 2014 presented jointly by the Virginia Conservation Network and the Virginia League of Conservation Voters. Fracking represents huge changes to our state, its economy, and its environmental health; all of Virginia’s citizens need to become informed about this issue. Here is Marcia’s report:… [Read More]

Matelea obliqua: Climbing Milkweed

By SUZANNE DINGWELL | June 23, 2014

Did you know that monarchs are not the only caterpillars that feed exclusively on milkweeds?  From our guest blogger and photographer, Fritz Flohr Reynolds: Matelea obliqua, climbing or oblique milkweed, is a perennial herbaceous vine native to the eastern United States. Its range includes Washington D.C., as well as parts of Maryland and Virginia, including… [Read More]