If You Plant It, They Will Come

Tippecanoe Lake Native Plantings - Ashburn 1

“If you plant it they will come,” to paraphrase a line from the iconic Kevin Costner film, “Field of Dreams.” That was the hope of John Magee,  former Horticulture Chair of the Virginia Native Plant Society. John’s firm, Magee Design, partnered with Ashburn Village in Loudoun County in an effort to revitalize Tippecanoe Lake, one of 8… [Read More]

A Visit to The Cedars Natural Area Preserve Appreciation Days

Cedars Appreciation Group at River

I’m back from far southwest Virginia, and I have to share.  The Virginia Native Plant Society contributed to purchasing land to join together some of the disparate tracts of The Cedars Natural Area. In appreciation, Rob Evans, Natural Areas Protection Manager, Virginia Natural Heritage Program in the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), organized a… [Read More]

A Path Into Natives

The front yard meadow garden in fall:  Aromatic asters (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium) put on a show while other perennials go to seed. More habitat, less lawn.

My interest in native plants probably arose like it did for many of the VNPS readers. I fell in love with what I found out in the wild places; state parks and national forests and the scraps of nature on the edges of farms and developments. I was fascinated by the presence of those native… [Read More]

The Awkward Relationship Between Homo sapiens And Planet Earth

Scott's Run , a VNPS Registry site.  Photo: Laura Beaty

I, as do so many of you, present lectures and workshops to a wide range of people in which we are encouraging them to become familiar with the local flora, to plant native plants that require less water, to plant and conserve those species that are important to insects, birds and other animal species, a… [Read More]

Looking Back: VNPS in 2017

Study, learn, contribute!
Photo: SPD

Small but mighty, the VNPS rose up with spirit to meet the challenges of 2017.  The members of our Society did not sit around eating bonbons and gnashing teeth over discouraging events last year. Well, maybe there was some gnashing of teeth . . . but in the end, dedicated people got out and got… [Read More]

Finding Fulfillment as a Wildlife Way Station Volunteer

Monarch butterfly on Boneset, (Eupatorium perfoliatum). The garden is filled specifically with both nectar and host plants to support a wide range of pollinators

My excitement rose when I first glimpsed the Wildlife Way Station being maintained at the car rest area along I-95 in Dale City. A good-sized plot of land was being cultivated with native plants that were attracting and feeding many of the area’s wild birds and insects — pollinators. Those small flyers have been losing… [Read More]

Botany Without Boundaries at the Tri-State Conference

Dryopteris intermedia, triplodea, and carthusiana, respectively

The Tri-state Native Plant Society Conference at the National Conservation Training Center was a blast this year.  From the venue, to the nightly speakers, to the field trips, everything was incredible, which is why I’d like to first extend my gratitude to all those who contributed and worked so hard to make it happen.  This… [Read More]

A Summer Intern Speaks Out

Native Bumble Bee makes use of Purple Milkweed, (Asclepias purpurea). Virginia's largest population of this plant lives at Huntley.

The listing of the Rusty Patched Bumblebee, (Bombus affinus), on the Endangered Species Act hit me as a surprise. It made me begin to think about bee habitat and how little the public knows about how to help this species. This bumblebee, along with many other pollinators, needs cover for protection throughout the year, but… [Read More]

The Preservation of Remnant Native Oaks in Urban and Suburban Areas

house

I and others have recently received inquiries regarding cases of oak decline and death throughout Arlington County and the City of Alexandria, Virginia – oak species (Quercus spp.) being the dominant and characteristic trees of the upland landscape in both jurisdictions. In all cases over the years, I have not seen any evidence of disease… [Read More]

Pollinator Week: Something to Celebrate!

"The future flies on wings of pollinators"

The fascinating process of pollination, and the beautiful creatures who perform it, these are indeed wonderful things to celebrate. Pollinator Week 2016, June 20 – 26, comes at a good time for us to focus on something we can all appreciate, understand, and support. Certainly there is more to know, but what fun would it… [Read More]