Piedmont Chapter Curlyhead Flower T-Shirts are now available for sale!

Photo by Karen Hendershot

Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Winterberry (Ilex verticillata) at Shenandoah National Park

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Eupatorium at Bull Run

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

Photo by Brigitte Hartke

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News & Updates

• Wildflower of the Week #51: In the marsh, big yellow flowers glow above heart-shaped leaves. Do you know what it is? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #50: White flowers rise from a stone ledge in very early spring. Do you know what it is? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #49: You might mistake this woodland wildflower for a pine cone or an ear of corn. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #48: This low-lying plant in the Heath family is a promise of Spring. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #47: This plant's long golden catkins dangle at the water’s edge. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Now available: Dr. Emily Southgate's Zoom presentation on "Not Your Textbook Roots, Stems, and Leaves" on February 27. Watch the video recording now.

• Did you miss Dr. Emily Southgate's Zoom presentation on "Plants Beyond the Basics" January 30? Watch the video recording now.

• Wildflower of the Week #46: This small rock-loving fern has once-cut fronds. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #45: Corky ridges and warts cover the trunk. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #44: A solitary striped and pleatedleaf catches your eye. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #43: This shrub or small tree in the Rose family has unbranched spines. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #42: This lover of wet ground shows very different fronds in summer and winter. See photos and last week's answer.

Cathy Mayes Memorial Fund: The Piedmont Chapter has formed a partnership with the Clifton Institute near Warrenton to honor the memory of Cathy Mayes. See more about the Memorial Fund and how to donate in Cathy's memory.

• Wildflower of the Week #41: This twining vine has distinctive three-bladed capsules. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #39: This little evergreen vine in the Madder family brightens the winter woods. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #38: Brilliant, densely packed red berries stand out dramatically on bare branches. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #37: In an old field or in your living room at Christmas, this familiar tree has much to give. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #36: Look along field edges for a tree with blocky checkerboard bark and orange fruits. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #35: Don’t sample this alluring yellow fruit in the Nightshade family. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #34: Look upward to find this native shrub clasping its host tree. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #33: This widespread low tree or tall shrub in the Cashew family comes into its own in the fall. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #32: A member of the Evening primrose family holds seeds in marvelous capsules. What is it? See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #31: This gender-bender bears a brilliant spike of red-orange berries. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #30: In November, this plant's berries seem to stare back at you. Handle with care! See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #29: This shrubby tree has flowers with four strappy yellow petals. Look for them around Halloween. See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #28: These small yellow flowers shine on shallow river shorelines. What are they? See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #27: Show-stopper in the fall, with scarlet leaves and dark blue fruit? See photos and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #26: This mint family member has tiny bluish flowers and a sharp aroma. See photos and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #25: Graceful white sprays of these odd flowers appear above a whorl of three leaves. See a photo and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #24: This super-strong member of the daisy family holds its clusters of brilliant magenta or purple flowers as much as ten feet high. See a photo and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #23: What is a leathery evergreen fern with spores in tan globes? See a photo and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #22: In the Mint family with squarish heads of packed purple flowers? See a photo and last week's answer.

• Wildflower of the Week #21: Can you identify a member of the Bellflower family with thick spires of violet-blue? See a photo and last week's answer.

• Check out the Sky Meadows Flagged Walk: Friday, September 4th through Sunday the 13th.

• Wildflower of the Week #20: White flowers, toothed leaflets, in the Buttercup Family? See a photo and last week's answer.

Wildflower of the Week #19: What wispy grass lends a purple haze to a whole field when blooming? See the photo and last week's answer.

• The (Northern) Piedmont Native Plants guide is back in stock. Check out all the regional native plant guides available for download and print copy purchase8/17/2020

• Wildflower of the Week #18: A yellow flower in the bean family, tall patches in meadows, pods turn black in fall. Do you know the name?

• Wildflower of the Week #17: Evergreen leaves, silvery veins, tiny hairs cover the flowers. What is it?

• Wildflower of the Week #16: What woodland native grows 6 feet high with spreading umbels drooping down like pink-white fireworks? 7/31/2020

Wildflower of the Week #15: What is this fragrant member of the Onograceae family that shines best at sunset? 7/25/2020

• Wildflower of the Week #14: Can you identify this small tree in the Rose family at high elevations in Virginia, including Shenandoah National Park? 7/18/2020

Remember to: Check out our Facebook and Instagram pages! 7/18/2020

• New Video: Marion Lobstein and Sally Anderson present an Overview and How To on the Flora of Virginia Mobile App. 7/13/2020

• The Summer, 2020 edition of the Leaflet newsletter is now available! Read about the Blue Ridge Center for Environmental Stewardship walk, Loudoun county native plants, and summer outlook for flowers and the G. R. Thompson Wildlife Management Area. 5/24/2020

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RSS Virginia Native Plant Society Blog

  • Redbud is Ready for Spring March 26, 2021
    By Betsy Washington, Northern Neck Chapter As signs of spring fill the air, I find myself eagerly anticipating the vibrant magenta pink blooms of one of our most beautiful flowering trees, the Eastern Redbud (Cercis canadensis). This small tree is a common sight along roadsides, woodland edges, and old fields in Virginia in late March…
    VNPS Communications
  • Beyond the Field – Enter March 9, 2021
    By Nicola McGoff, Jefferson Chapter You drive by it every day, without notice. It is just a field. An ordinary everyday field. Square shaped or almost anyway, with very defined boundaries. Manmade boundaries stretching back through time. The sedentary, fallow field. Static and uninviting for most. A place where utility trumps esthetic. Perchance, one day…
    VNPS Communications
  • Phasing Out the Propagation and Sale of Invasive Plants February 19, 2021
    Virginia House Joint Resolution 527 calls for a study that will explore options for phasing out the propagation and sale of invasive plants in Virginia’s horticultural industry, which may include potential legislative action to be brought the following year to the 2022 General Assembly. Update 2/18/2021: House Joint Resolution (HJ 527) was approved  by the…
    VNPS Communications
  • Skunk Cabbage Secrets February 18, 2021
    By Nancy Sorrells On this winter weather Valentine’s Day I decided to journey back into the forest behind our property to the secret place I know where the globally rare Swamp Pink (Helonias bullata) grows. Today’s visit was not to see Swamp Pink, which is still sleeping and will not send up its amazing pink…
    VNPS Communications
  • Wildflower of the Year 2021 American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) February 6, 2021
    Wisteria frutescens is a woody liana, potentially growing to heights of 15 m; young stems are smooth or covered with small hairs pressed tightly to the stem surface. Stems climb by twining around supports in a clockwise direction. Leaves are alternate and odd-pinnately compound, 10—30 cm long. Leaves may have from 5 to 15 leaflets…
    VNPS Communications
  • A Parasitic Lifestyle: Beechdrops and Their Relatives December 17, 2020
    By Marion Lobstein Two primary characteristics of plants are a light-capturing pigment, chlorophyll, which gives most plants a green color, and the use of this pigment to capture light energy to carry out photosynthesis to produce energy-rich food from carbon dioxide and water. This kind of plant lifestyle is known as autotrophic or self-nourishing. Indian…
    VNPS Communications
  • Red Chokeberry Shines in All Seasons November 9, 2020
    By Betsy Washington, Northern Neck Chapter Red Chokeberry (Aronia arbutifolia) is a versatile landscape shrub that shines in all four seasons of the year. In spring, showy clusters of up to 25 pristine white, or pink-blushed flowers light up the garden. Throughout summer the foliage is a lustrous dark green, then ignites in fall with shades…
    VNPS Communications
  • Goldenrod Glows in the Fall October 1, 2020
    By Richard Stromberg Along with Asters, Goldenrods are the dominant flowers in September. Some of them continue flowering into October, and you will see their fluffy seed heads all winter. Goldenrods have small-flowered, yellow spikes and sprays. Twenty goldenrod species are frequent in the Piedmont Chapter area. Note that the large leaves at the base…
    VNPS Communications
  • The Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly and its Native Host Plants September 10, 2020
    By Mary Lee Epps, Jefferson Chapter I decided to write this article for our chapter Newsletter, The Declaration, because of an experience I had two years ago. On a family outing to the Dripping Rock area of the Blue Ridge Parkway, we explored a trail that leads from the west side of the Parkway. After…
    VNPS Communications
  • All About the Stamens September 2, 2020
    By Betty Truax, Jefferson Chapter Years ago, when I lived in Northern Virginia, my mom gave me a Mock Orange plant that had no scent. It was a shared plant from her friend Anna Davis in Rochelle, Virginia. The plant was important to my mom because it reminded her of being young. With this particular…
    VNPS Communications